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 No.10

2012 Chevrolet Volt Energy Efficiency

Weber State University (WSU) - Automotive Technology Department - Advanced Vehicle Systems Lab. A description and demonstration of the energy efficiency the 2012 Chevrolet Volt Extended Range Vehicle. This vehicle combines an Electric Vehicle (EV) for trips 25-52 miles in length with a gasoline-powered generator (40 mpg+) for trips with no length restrictions. The vehicle in this video averages 216 mpg at 65 mph on electricity on EV mode for 82% of the driving. Actual road test efficiencies are shown in this video.

You will benefit the most from the Chevrolet Volt if your daily commuting matches one of the following two conditions:

1. Your round trip commute is less than 35 miles. You will typically not use any gasoline at all. Your power bill will increase approximately $1.00 to $1.50 per commuting day. The vehicle in this video increased the owner's power bill approximately $18.00 per month.

2. Your one-way trip commute is less than 35 miles AND you can plug the Volt in at work to charge the battery for the commute home. You will typically not use any gasoline at all. Your power bill will increase approximately $1.00 to $1.50 per commuting day plus whatever electricity charge your employer charges you.

You can drive farther than 35 miles; you could drive across the U.S.A., but in that driving mode the engine-driven generator will get an EPA estimated 40 mpg. The vehicle in this video averages 40 - 46 mpg at 65 mph on gasoline (which is better than almost every other vehicle on the road today in the U.S.A.).

The Volt always drives using the 360V DC battery charge for the first 25-52 miles (dependent upon driving style and outside temperatures). After the battery energy reaches a low threshold, the internal combustion engine (ICE) will automatically start and drive a generator. The generator powers the two electric motors in the automatic transaxle to propel the vehicle.

The cost of electricity in northern Utah is 9.7 cents per kWh of power. The Volt's 360V battery is a 16kWh battery, but only 10.3kWh of power is used for EV only driving. The cost to charge the battery is 99.91 cents. The remaining battery capacity is for starting the engine in extended range mode. The 10.3 kWh of power can allow you drive 35 EPA rated miles. Assuming you had a car that got an average of 35 mpg, the cost of electricity for the Volt to drive 35 miles is approximately four times less expensive than gasoline in June of 2012. Assuming you had a SUV that got an average of 15 mpg, the cost of electricity for the Volt to drive 35 miles is approximately nine times less expensive than gasoline in June of 2012. The Volt is an expensive car, but if it costs you a lot less for fuel, the overall cost of driving a Volt is quite reasonable.

Be sure to see our two other Chevrolet Volt videos:
1. 2012 Chevrolet Volt High Voltage Battery Charging
2. 2012 Chevrolet Volt Overview

We teach advanced vehicle technologies to our automotive students at Weber State University and online. For more information visit: http://www.weber.edu/automotive

This video was created and edited by John D. Kelly at WSU. For a full biography, see
https://www.weber.edu/automotive/J_Kelly.html

Donate to the Department of Automotive Technology at Weber state University here:
http://advancement.weber.edu/givetowsu


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